Saturday, October 25, 2014

A steam locomotive comes home

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Here is the locomotive you've all been waiting for!
It has finally come to rest beside the 1915 Ottoman Turkish Beer Sheva train station.


Isn't it a beauty?!


Just outside the newly-restored but not yet officially opened train yard is Atatürk Plaza.
You can see the bust of Atatürk and the obelisk commemorating the 298 Turkish soldiers who were killed on the Beer Sheva front in World War I.
See more about this in my post about the annual Australian Light Horse Commemoration Day


During Sukkot holiday the compound was open for just a few days.
Engine 70414 Compound guides were proud and excited to explain the history and also about the restoration work.
Site director Chen, in the photo, said their crew was stoked whenever a train-washing day came around, like after a muddy rain.   (Well, she didn't use the work stoked but I think it is appropriate for a coal-burning steam engine.)

In the coming posts I will try to explain how and why this steam engine had a circuitous route, from England to Palestine, through the Suez Canal to Turkey, to Great Britain, and finally back to Beer Sheva.
It is a long story and involves a secret operation.
But meanwhile I'd like you simply to feast your eyes on 70414 and enjoy!

(Linking to Our World Tuesday.)
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12 comments:

William Kendall said...

That is a magnificent machine!

yael said...

I am always happy to learn new things here in your blog:)
my fother is 91 and still remebers his travels with the train from Haifa to Beirut as a kid.

Dina said...

William, magnificent is a fitting word here!

Yael, your father rode the famous Hejaz Railway?!! To Beirut?!
Wow, I'm stoked!

Nadege said...

Yes, William is right. Magnificent is definitively the right word.

Karl Demetz said...

Oh, this is a beauty! I love these old locomotives.

VP said...

Amazing! It is a British engine, I guess...

José Mendonça said...

A beauty indeed!

Spiderdama said...

It is so very beautiful!!

crystal said...

There's something so interesting about these kind of trains. There's one near here that I rode on once called "the skunk train" :) ...
http://www.skunktrain.com/

Linda said...

How wonderful, Dina!

Sara said...

It certainly does look clean and spiffy. I loved your choice of the word stoked and noticed right away the connection to the steam engine - LOL. The tale you are promising to tell us has me intrigued.

Indrani said...

Very interesting. Old may be but a beauty even today.