Monday, April 20, 2015

Blood-red flowers for memorial day

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Tuesday evening Israel will enter into the saddest day of our calendar, Yom Hazikaron, the memorial day for Israel’s fallen soldiers and victims of terrorism.
The soldiers number 23,320.


This year's poster says, Nizkor et kulam, we will remember them all.
The roundish red flowers have become a symbol for our day of remembering (perhaps influenced by the tradition of the red poppy in other countries).

Wikipedia says, "The red everlasting is a flowering plant of the genus Helichrysum in the daisy family (Asteraceae).  It is a protected plant in some jurisdictions (in particular, Israel and the Palestinian Authority).
It is known there as 'Blood of the Maccabees' (Hebrew: Dam Hamakabim).
Its name is derived from a legend saying that in every spot one grows, a drop of blood has been spilled on the earth."

Indeed . . .
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An article at Israel21C  talks about the flower and how its portrayal on Israeli stamps has evolved over the decades. 
And here is more about the plant. 
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(Linking to OurWorld Tuesday.)
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9 comments:

Gerard Michaud said...

I will remember with you.
Alice

William Kendall said...

The numbers speak volumes.

Hels said...

Red poppies were wild flowers that grew throughout Flanders Field in the first world war. They were placed on the graves of British Empire soldiers who died in the fields and couldn't be given a proper grave stone.

The red everlasting flower is a beautiful way to remember Israel's fallen soldiers and victims of terrorism.

Cloudia said...

We will remember too

Spiderdama said...

Friends of Israel will remember with you.

Anonymous said...

In my country exists a Memorial Day called Totensonntag , honoring all fallen or dead people. More appropriate in my opinion. The Nahost - Konflikt is a very complicated subject and there are too many victims on both sides. What a crazy world we are living in.
Martha

Birdman said...

Thanks for adding that explanation. When will we ever learn?

VP said...

As I have already told you many times, one of my fondest memories in Israel was being there during these days: the day of mourning and the day of joy, just after that...

José Mendonça said...

The blooms look amazing but Google images show a lot of different species under the same name. Confusing (not new!)...