Sunday, July 6, 2008

Here today, gone today

 .
I lived once in Switzerland, surrounded by farm fields and vineyards. [sigh . . .]
 Walking to Lake Neuchatel, I was delighted to see a lone sunflower left in the field after the farmer had harvested his crop (forgot what crop, something green).
The lake was lovely and the Alps were shimmering on the horizon like a mirage. On the way home, full of joy at the glory of Creation, I suddenly realized that the sunflower had been taken.


It was devastating! Who could do such a thing?
Where was this poor sunflower's Little Prince?!

"If some one loves a flower, of which just one single blossom grows in all the millions and millions of stars, it is enough to make him happy just to look at the stars. He can say to himself: 'Somewhere, my flower is there...' But if the sheep eats the flower, in one moment all his stars will be darkened...And you think that is not important!"      -- The Little Prince, chapter 7
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16 comments:

Nathalie said...

Oh yes, I remember that chapter of the The Little Prince. But you had the sunflower in your heart and it still lives within you, picked or not.

MEDITERRANEAN KIWI said...

wonderful link to the Little Prince.

what do we say before a meal in Greece? we do the sign of the cross, and say KALOS IRTHATE (to our guests, ot which they reply KALOS SAS VRIKAME) - you came well, we found you well.

Dina said...

Mais oui, c'est vrai, chere Nathalie. The fact that the picture lived in my heart, even though tucked into my photo archive, and cried out to be shared, proves you right. I was just sad that someone could have taken down the sunflower and sad that others would not enjoy seeing it.

Marie said...

I take photos of flowers when I want them to become immortal! That's what you did when you photographed the sunflower.

I think the respect of nature should be better taught at school. In the residence where I live in Montpellier, the children destroy flowers and bushes all the time.

Dina said...

Thanks Kiwi. So the good appetite thing is just a given at the Greek table, eh? No need to wish it to someone. Looking through your luscious blog http://organicallycooked.blogspot.com/
I can understand why!

Gretchen said...

Another place that is on my bucket list. (Places I have to see and things I must do before I kick the bucket.)

Thanks for sharing!

Dina said...

Marie, many decades ago Israel had a campaign to teach kids and the public not to pick wildflowers. It worked!
Gretchen, Switzerland? Yes, you'll love it.

Tipper said...

Oh thank you for sharing this picture and memory from your past. I really like it!

kjpweb said...

But - maybe the one who took this flower, dried it and is still - after all these time - enjoying it's beauty! You never know!
Good post either way!
Cheers, Klaus

Michelle said...

A program not to pick wildflowers? Good idea..It seems that there is a real disconnect between young people and the natural world. At least, that is what I observe here...

Kris McCracken said...

A lovely photograph and story. For what it is worth, I’ve always been a “stop and smell the roses” kind of guy, but leave them in the ground.

There seems little point removing the pleasure for everyone else for the sake of my own little piece captured for a few days.

Kay said...

It's so important to teach respect to children and sometimes to adults. To respect nature, to respect people, to respect yourself....

Reader Wil said...

When ever I see a beautiful bouquet of flowers I take a photo of it and sometimes I use it as a picture postcard.
I also love sunflowers.They are so strong and colourful. I'll send you some! By e-mail!

JC said...

Dina, Love this picture. It reminds me of a lone sunflower growing and blooming on the road I travel going to work. It must have been displaced by construction earlier in the year. It is beautiful all by itself. Thanks for sharing. JC

Dina said...

Hi Tipper and JC, thanks for your encouragement to share some personal feelings as well.

Klaus, ja ja, let us hope so. You are such an optimistic guy. Sehr gut.

Kris, good onya, mate. (Did I say it right?) Henry the same?

Michelle, oh, that's sad. Israelis are madly in love with nature and the Land.

Kay, too bad all kids don't have a teacher like you who lives and teaches respect.

Wil, good idea. Thanks for sending photos. Strange to see a whole mega-bouquet of sunflowers.

babooshka said...

The best place for flowers are in the ground surrounded by insects and wildlife. Everyone by now knows how strongly I feel about wildlife so for me this is a perfect post.