Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Dagger display


To my delight, these dangerous daggers were safely displayed behind glass at Jerusalem's Museum of Islamic Art. 

(Yes, it's ABC Wednesday D-day.)


The kind  without a fancy hilt is called katar, I think.
They are all antique daggers from around the Middle East. 

Besides being a weapon of war, the dagger is useful in hunting and eating, and a beautiful one can be a ceremonial status symbol. 
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UPDATE:  You can see the 4,000-year-old stone  pommel of a Canaanite dagger that we unearthed at the Holyland Park dig in Jerusalem in an earlier post.
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23 comments:

Reader Wil said...

They all look pretty dangerous! I remember that my father once brought home an Indonesian dagger, called a "kris". We were forbidden to play with it.But still some of them are very beautiful.If they could speak what stories would they tell?

JM said...

That's a beautiful collection!

Jedediah said...

I love museums that let you take photos. It's quite a collection they have.

Dina said...

Wil, wow, glad you kids didn't play with the "kris."
I don't think I want to hear the stories these daggers could tell, sorry.

JM, thanks. I'll have to show you more of the weapons room.

Jedediah, but I must confess: I saw the NO Photography sign only at the end of my visit to the museum. But there was no one around to stop me, so . . .

VioletSky said...

These have such beautiful (if brutal!) curves to them. I wonder how they decided which form was the most useful/deadly. And I wonder how on earth anyone could carry those long, elongated ones!

richies said...

I wouldn't want to meet someone armed with these daggers, but they are quite beautiful.

An Arkies Musings

Francisca said...

Dazzling and dangerous. I'm not a dagger person myself, even if I appreciate the artistry, but my sweetie loves to look at them.

Leif Hagen said...

They let crafty, sneaky, dangerous, suspicious people like you get so close to those daggers, Dina?!

Amy said...

Dina, first time on your site; also, first time on ABC. Interesting photos. I wish I had NOT seen the "No Photos" sign at the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame. I so wanted to have myself photographed standing next to Janis Joplin's slogan-and-charm encrusted little convertible!

"D" is for Dina! Amy Barlow Libertore, and here's mine, only it's rather Dark:'

http://sharplittlepencil.wordpress.com/2011/02/08/d-is-for-abc-weds/

Peace, Amy Barlow Liberatore

ρομπερτ said...

How impressive a sight, ability to be close to history. Thank you for teaching me about this. Please have a good Wednesday.

daily athens

Roger Owen Green said...

cool, and a bit scary.

ROG, ABC Wednesday team

Wanda said...

They look pretty dang scary.... I'll keep my distance.

Kay L. Davies said...

Interesting daggers for the letter D, Dina.
-- K

Halie Santos - Dayo said...

They look sharp and dangerous. Thank you for sharing a piece of history and culture from your side of the world.

Nathalie
ABC Wednesday Team

Rosy said...

The first photo showing the daggers looks to be that their handles are made from bone, these are interesting and fascinating, I also like the pictures of the people showing what clothes they wore.

Thank you for sharing these.

Kay said...

Hmmm... they look rather pointy and lethal to eat with. Just looking at them would scare anyone.

VP said...

I bought a couple of fake daggers in Jordan just to have them confiscated at the Eilat border crossing by the Israeli police...

Greensboro Daily Photo said...

Amy got it first, "D" is for (digging) DINA! The dagger collection is daunting!

Kate said...

The daggers look positively menacing so I'm happy that you added the positive use of these interesting objects.

Candace said...

Great "D" day post! I'm so happy to have stumbled upon your blog. I'm going to spend some time here looking around. Blessings, Candace

Pietro said...

I find these daggers nice and well laid out.

Dhemz said...

wow! those are interesting...thanks for sharing.
Check out my ABC Wednesday entry too! Thanks a lot, much appreciated!

Glennis said...

Great collection, glad they are safely kept behind glass.