Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Three together in life and in death

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An unusual grouping of tombstones from World War I.
The reason for it: the three men died together when their vehicle was blown up.
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Please enlarge (click once and then again on the photo that opens) and see and say the names of the British soldiers who died fighting a war far from home.
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To see more of the [British] Jerusalem War Cemetery (of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission) please click on my ANZAC Day label.
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A post for Taphophile Tragics.
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14 comments:

VP said...

A sad story, but it is good that they are remembered together...

Gemma Wiseman said...

Woo! That is quite an emotional sight! I like how similar each headstone is too! In death, they died as one! And love the pretty touch of the gold flowers embracing the headstones!

CaT said...

how sad is that!
i wonder whom decided to put them together. what about wives? children? etc...?

Hels said...

Thankfully the men were buried with dignity, giving their grieving widows and parents somewhere to pay their respects. And a grateful nation, as well.

Scrappy Grams said...

such a strong statement about the men with this grouping!

Robert Geiss said...

A very moving sight. May they not be forgotten.

hamilton said...

The stones are unusually close together. But then, so were these men.

cieldequimper said...

These look incredibly like the ones in Versailles. Same stone.

Danke for the wishes.

14° and buckets of rain forecast for tomorrow and I'm supposed to go to an open air concert of Baremboim's West-Eastern orchestra...

Dina said...

Ciel, I thing all the British war cemeteries around the world are pretty standard, they all look alike.

Birdman said...

Thanks for that link. Greatly enjoy old cemeteries and unique headstones.

Adullamite said...

It is possible these men were killed in an explosion that made it difficult to tell the bodies apart. This was not unusual at that time, several such graves exist.

Cloudy said...

Ja leider, viele, zu viele Soldaten auf dieser Welt starben und sterben immer wieder fern der Heimat. Oft in Ländern die sie gar nicht kennen, dort liegen sie begraben. Und dennoch ist es gut, wenn es solche Stätten des Gedenkens für sie gibt...

Lieben Gruß
CL

Nicola Carpenter said...

Such brave men. My mother used to work for The Commowealth War Graves Commisson. The reason behind grouped grave stones like these is that they unfortunately couldn't tell which bit belonged to who, so they were all buried together.

Herding Cats

Julie said...

In a situation like this, I can understand the closeness of the graves, and the headstones. The cemetery is so very well maintained, Dina. The gazanias are a delight.

The other thing I note is no ages on the headstones, yet perhaps the Captain was considerably older than the other two departed.

I do like the names of their units being hussars and yeomanry. Speaks loudly of ages past.

RIP ...