Thursday, August 13, 2015

Not much protection

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In the sculpture garden of Rabin (Beilinson) Medical Center, Petah Tikva.
Please enlarge the photo to enjoy the nice details.


Here are some (big) words of interpretation by Tami Katz-Freiman which appear at the late Ofra Zimbalista's website:

. . . a woman in drapings hovers in the air holding an umbrella with holes . . .
Existential anguish, shame, and misery sometimes dress up as pride and bravura (like the woman holding the umbrella with holes in it), and as in Hanoch Levin’s plays they are depicted with humor and a sense of acceptance of fate. The silent figures portray their tragic situation with a sarcastic muteness.
The sense of muteness and almost religious submission are augmented by the deep ultramarine blue and the gold that glints out here and there in various places. The reduction to blue and gold, colors which have a distinctively metaphysical, spiritual (Christian) context, with a cultural meaning that is rich in symbolism (Virgin Mary, the Evil Eye, New Age), abstracts the realism of the figures, unifies them into a kind of fantastic realism, and distances them from prosaic everyday existence, to a poetic-allegoric-symbolic existence.
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7 comments:

Jackie @ travelnwrite said...

Thank goodness they often post what messages you are supposed to be getting from statues like this woman - I'd have never figured all that out and been focused on the holes in the umbrella! Great post.

VP said...

I remember her “Walls and Trumpets”, on the façade of Maya House, in London. Too many words for something not too different from painted mannequins...

Birdman said...

Little shelter here from the storm.

Gosia k said...

lovely woman but the umbrella is unique and not suitable for our heat in Europe now

William Kendall said...

It certainly does capture one's attention, though!

Petrea Burchard said...

Thanks, Dina. Lovely photo and interesting sculpture. Sometimes I wish the "experts" wouldn't tell me what to think about a work of art.

Hels said...

Love it :)

But I don't know about existential anguish, shame and misery. Perhaps she is just being a well dressed young lady, making her way in the world despite the normal difficulties that we all face.