Monday, April 6, 2009

Passover prep: That's My World

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Some of the kids of my moshav got together today to learn and teach how to make matzot.
Matza is the unleavened bread that we will eat instead of fluffy regular bread for the next week, remembering our quick-exit exodus from Egypt.



The flat hot bread that came off the taboon was really tasty.

Meticulous house-cleaning, grocery shopping, and preparing food for the seder meal of Erev Pesach--most Jewish Israelis can currently say That's My World, pretty much ALL of it.
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For more about mountains of store-bought matza you might see my last year's post.
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28 comments:

erin said...

enjoyed your entry this week...have a good tuesday.

Jeannette St.G. said...

Yes, and they have turned the non-jewish people on to it too! A friend took us one year to one, and since then I love the ceder meal, with all of it's symbols.

richies said...

That does look tasty

An Arkies Musings

kjpweb said...

I can almost smell it! :)
Happy passover!
Cheers, Klaus

Martha said...

Wonderful, I've never seen the teaching of making matoz. I love to see kids hands on learning about their culture.

Carver said...

Great shots and a very interesting post.

Mary Elizabeth said...

Interesting to know.
looks really tasty!
Thanks for sharing. Have a wonderful week.
Mary Elizabeth Now and Then.

CathM said...

Blessings for the passover celebrations!

Guy D said...

I really enjoyed this post, Happy EAster!

Have a great week!
Guy
Regina In Pictures

JM said...

I would try some of that bread! :-)

SandyCarlson said...

That looks like fun. What a graet tradition to pass along.

Arija said...

Wonderful that the children can experience the traditional way of baking them rather than just in packets from the supermarket.
They have a special flavour being unleavened and without salt.
What would the world be without traditions.

Hilda said...

Flame-baked bread sounds yummy. Seems similar to a lot of Asian and Mediterranean flat breads I've tried too. Thanks for this very informative post, Dina.

Cloudia said...

Thanks for including us!
Best wishes & Aloha, Dina

Nazzareno said...

To teach playing, a way in order to approach the children the acquaintance. The first person in Italy to having this intuition has been a woman: Maria Montessori

Rinkly Rimes said...

My blog is about the Easter Bunny I'm afraid. But it's not in favour!

Yaelian said...

How nice that in your moshav people can take part in the matsah making! Chag Pesach Sameah Dina!

soulbrush said...

'chag semeach' dina to you and all your family (did your grand-kids come from australia?)

Reader Wil said...

Have a great Passover! The feast of being delivered from slavery and tyranny. We also buy matza.

Abe Lincoln said...

What a wonderful lesson in life to pass along.

Jack and Joann said...

Happy Passover. The photos remind me of Native American Fry Bread of the American Southwest.

Kendris said...

Food cooked over an open fire almost always tastes better, for some reason.

Thanks for sharing!

Pietro said...

Dina, it must be a very good bread. I'd like to taste some, too.
The devastating earthquake has been Monday early in the morning in Central Italy in the Abruzzo region: Piedmont region, where I live, which is in the North of Italy, is luckily safe. It's a terrible tragedy: 207 victims and 17.000 homeless, for the time being. And the situation is extremely serious because there are still earth tremors.

Catherine said...

That's tradition. Important for the culture to pass along to young children.
I wish you a good week of preparation, Dina.

JC said...

I would love to have been there learning along with those children. I received an invitation to participate in a Seder Meal this coming Thursday. I'm so excited and honored to be invited. I've gotten so behind on visiting but I'm trying to catch up. I'm enjoying your posts this afternoon.

Kay said...

This looks like so much fun! Thanks for letting us take a peek.

Suzanne said...

Chag Sameach Dina.

Clara said...

It's so great that you teach your children traditions by including them in the preparation as well as in the actual seder meal. Thanks for showing us how you make matza. Have a blessed Passover.