Sunday, January 22, 2012

Made glad by stringed instruments

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For our PsalmChallenge at Daily Athens Photo, here is Psalm 45

1 For the Leader; upon Shoshannim; [a Psalm] of the sons of Korah. Maschil. A Song of loves.

2 My heart overfloweth with a goodly matter; I say: 'My work is concerning a king';
my tongue is the pen of a ready writer.
3 Thou art fairer than the children of men; grace is poured upon thy lips;
therefore God hath blessed thee for ever.
4 Gird thy sword upon thy thigh, O mighty one, thy glory and thy majesty.
5 And in thy majesty prosper, ride on, in behalf of truth and meekness and righteousness;
and let thy right hand teach thee tremendous things.
6 Thine arrows are sharp--the peoples fall under thee--[they sink] into the heart of the king's enemies.





7 Thy throne given of God is for ever and ever; a sceptre of equity is the sceptre of thy kingdom.
8 Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated wickedness;
9 Myrrh, and aloes, and cassia are all thy garments; out of ivory palaces stringed instruments have made thee glad.

10 Kings' daughters are among thy favourites; at thy right hand doth stand the queen in gold of Ophir.
11 'Hearken, O daughter, and consider, and incline thine ear; forget also thine own people, and thy father's house;
12 So shall the king desire thy beauty; for he is thy lord; and do homage unto him.
13 And, O daughter of Tyre, the richest of the people shall entreat thy favour with a gift.'
14 All glorious is the king's daughter within the palace; her raiment is of chequer work inwrought with gold.
15 She shall be led unto the king on richly woven stuff; the virgins her companions in her train being brought unto thee.
16 They shall be led with gladness and rejoicing; they shall enter into the king's palace.

17 Instead of thy fathers shall be thy sons, whom thou shalt make princes in all the land.
18 I will make thy name to be remembered in all generations; therefore shall the peoples praise thee for ever and ever.
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Translation from the Jewish Publication Society 1917 edition.
To hear the Psalm read in Hebrew: http://media.snunit.k12.il/kodeshm/mp3/t2645.mp3

Photo:
Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Ascension, Augusta Victoria, Mt. Scopus
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15 comments:

Louis la Vache said...

Excellent, Dina! It is so nice to have you and your blog back!

Greensboro Daily Photo said...

10 on is about daughters! Never paid attention to that before!

Dina said...

Thanks Louis, I am glad to be back with you all.

Jan in Greensboro, yes, verse 10-16 are in the feminine. But 17 and 18 switch back to masculine you.
English really should do something about her genderless 2nd person pronouns.
And English should have a proper "y'all" too.

Some think that the psalmist here, esp. in v. 11, has actually cloaked (in pretty words) a warning to the king, lest his foreign (pagan) wives lead him and the whole people astray to the worship of idols, as did Solomon's wives and King Ahab's Jezebel.

Birdman said...

My Sunday meditations. Thank you!

VP said...

Interesting thoughts for a Sunday afternoon...

Julie ScottsdaleDailyPhoto.com said...

you have a powerful statue today also. robert of athens and VP of Livorno also have interesting statues. Welcome back.

Mama Zen said...

Excellent shot!

Spiderdama said...

Special picture. I like that vers no 2 very much.

Hope you have a blessed week Dina:-)

Robert Geiss said...

Thank you for the honour to learn from you !

Thank you as well much for your kind participation and the picture which still is full of sound.

Please have a good new week ahead, and please join again soon.

Cloudia said...

Never realized how much I too appreciate you til you disappeared!




Aloha from Waikiki
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Shoshana said...

Wow!

Petrea Burchard said...

Dina, I think the psalm could be about absolutely anything and you would find the right picture to take!

Rachel said...

Beautiful photo to go along with this Psalm!

Sara said...

I like that you include the entire Psalm, Dina, for most of your posts, and highlight the verses illustrated. As you saw, I'm taking a page from your book and giving it a try for a while.

A harp-playing king...perhaps that is meant to be King David? Funny, I have never imagined him with a beard and I don't know why. Perhaps because he first appears as a youth guarding the sheep.

mirae said...

hello beautiful Dina, ew I love the colour that the statue is bathed in- the king's celestial wineblood-beautiful.