Thursday, January 29, 2015

The wire eruv surrounding our town

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Against the blue sky for SkyWatch Friday you can see the post and wires of the eruv on the west side of Meitar.


An eruv is something the rabbis thought up in order to get around the restrictions on carrying objects from the private to the public domain on Sabbath and holidays.
(You can click a few times to enlarge the photo and see the whole line of posts.)


Here's the eruv on the east side of town.

Let's let Wikipedia explain it:
An eruv is an enclosure around a home or community. It enables the carrying of objects out of doors for Jews on the Jewish Sabbath that would otherwise be forbidden by Torah law (Halakha). Without an eruv, Torah-observant Jews would be unable to carry keys or tissues in their pockets or push baby carriages on the Sabbath, thus making it difficult for many to leave home.
. . . When an eruv is made to demarcate a contemporary Jewish neighborhood, a symbolic fence is typically constructed using poles and wires as well as any solid walls available. Thus, a modern eruv is commonly composed of a series of 'doorframes,' with the poles forming the doorposts (lechi, pl. lechai'in) and the wire forming the lintel (korah)...
So the term eruv in modern Jewish usage usually refers to the wire that creates a symbolic "walled courtyard."
In effect it expands the private domain out into the public domain, thus permitting very religious Jews to carry certain things on Shabbat.
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The Sabbath starts just before sundown on Friday.   Shabbat shalom!
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14 comments:

Merisi said...

Thank you for sharing this, I had never heard of it before!

Wishing you a peaceful Sabbath,
Merisi

Laura said...

Beautiful clear skies. Shabbat Shalom :-)

William Kendall said...

That certainly is quite a workaround premise. This is the first I've heard of it.

Christian Weiß said...

An interesting capture and beautiful photos.

Jim said...

That's interesting.

Hels said...

"Without an eruv, Torah-observant Jews would be unable to carry keys or tissues in their pockets or push baby carriages on the Sabbath, thus making it difficult for many to leave home". This said it very clearly and well!

But only the women would be stuck at home. The men would get around town as usual :(

Petrea Burchard said...

Now that's what I call a "work-around."

Oakland Daily Photo said...

Fascinating. Your skies look very much like ours these days.

Kay said...

Oh my... bending the rules a bit, hunh?

GreensboroDailyPhoto said...

A very creative solution. It is my understanding that there is an "eruv" zone in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Is there such thing as "atar"? That is a word I remember hearing.

Janis
GDP

Dina said...

Janis in Greensboro shalom.
Many places in the USA have an eruv, but I don't know how they call it. Yes, your word "atar" is old Hebrew verb meaning to surround, to encircle. So that would be appropriate in talking about an eruv. Thanks!

VP said...

I know what an eruv is, but it is always strange to see in how many different ways it is 'implemented'!

cieldequimper said...

I like the creativity!

Rob the frog said...

Cheeky cheating in a way, but i just can imagine the years of heated discussions it must have taken them! Would be interesting to know the whole story behind it. Tsfat school?...Ingenious.