Sunday, July 19, 2009

The easel life in Jerusalem

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Summer is a season that draws our painters out to the Great Outdoors.
This one is painting the Machaneh Yehuda market.
Click on her canvas to enlarge and see one street of our big Jerusalem shuk.

And this woman found a vantage point on the outer side of the Old City ramparts, just past the Dung Gate.
From way up there she would be seeing the Mount of Olives on the eastern horizon.
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Robin, at her Israeli blog "Around the Island," invites us every Sunday to show what summer means for us. Take a look at this nice new Summer Stock meme , or sign Mr. Linky and join us with your own summery pictures.

33 comments:

Danielle Says Hello said...

I really enjoyed this view of another part of the world...thank you!

Yaelian said...

Nice pictures Dina! And thanks for the link to Robin's blog...

Robin said...

What a great slice of Jerusalem life Dina. I love the look on the face of the woman with the green shopping bag - she looks utterly perplexed.

I've always wished I could paint but sadly I'm utterly without talent, even paint by numbers is well beyond my ability. Luckily technology allows me to create my visions with my photographs instead.

Abe Lincoln said...

Her crowd of one onlooker does seem a bit skeptical.

Your subject matter never ceases to amaze me.

Your visit will count and help me Make History. Pick a Peck of Pixels

Reader Wil said...

Dina! Thanks for these most interestings views of Jerusalem.
The word easel is in Dutch "ezel", which is also the word for donkey!

richies said...

Dina, Some friends and I were having a discussion yesterday and we wondered how people keep the Sabbath in the far north where the summertime the sun never really sets. As we were talking I thought of you, So I pose the question to you. Your insights would be appreciated.

An Arkies Musings

Dina said...

Richie, shalom.
Well, I never had the problem of living near the North Pole so I don't know how to answer your question.
Here is something from the Chabad website about a seder in Finland:
"As one of the northernmost Chabad centers, the Wolffs are grateful that Passover arrives in the spring. Being so close to the North Pole means that holidays that fall out in winter and summer begin at extreme times. Winter Shabbat can start at 2 p.m. on Friday afternoon with Shabbat ending at 1 a.m. on Sunday. “Even at that time, it’s not truly dark, but Shabbat is over because another day has begun,” says Wolff. Springtime moderates the sun’s rise and set times, so Passover begins at 8 p.m. making it easier for families here in the land of midnight sun, to celebrate the Festival of Freedom at an elaborate Seder."

For a more detailed and complicated answer see
http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/27/Q1/

Now, aren't we glad we live where we live?! :)

Gretchen said...

I always love coming here to see your part of the world! The things we see on the nightly news are not the beauty you show us here.

FA said...

After enlarging the second picture, it was fun to see all the goodies for sale from this vendor. I enjoy open air markets. Although around here, they usually exist only in the summer and one day per week, at that.

JM said...

Great street scene catch and impressive walls!

Cindy said...

Great and interesting photos. I too enjoyed this look at another part of the world. I look forward to visiting again. ~Cindy

Kay said...

Lovely, shot, Dina. I like the idea of taking a photo of a person doing another impression of the area in a different media.

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

I guess one reason that you have painters is that there are interesting things to paint. Here in Tulsa, I have seen exactly one painter set up in the 17 years I've lived here. Some photographers, 1 painter.

Joyce said...

Love the photo of another persons view of the city. I am enjoying SS so that I can see other areas of our big world. Thanks for sharing your interesting photo.
Joyce

Isle Dance said...

Stunning...!

Meead said...

Thanks Dina for your visit and comment. Yeah, I've heard about the violence in Jerusalem. Was it only because of the Gay Pride Parade? Regardless what religions say about homosexuality, it's still socially unacceptable in many middle eastern countries like Iran. In Iran it's banned but the interesting point is that the government financialy support gays to have the horrible sex change surgery.

Nice photos here! Today we have a Plein Air Painting event in Portland. I may go and check it out.

Thoughtfully blended hearts said...

I am so happy I stumbled upon this meme and got to visit you...love your amazing photos of places I've only dreamed of seeing....

Dina said...

Thanks everyone, such interesting comments!

Meead shalom. No, this year they decided not to protest the parade. But last week the ultra-orthodox found a new reason to riot. Please see my post of July 17. Such a strange story.

Have a good Sunday. Hope you go to that painting event. Should be good blog fodder. :)

David Cranmer said...

I'm glad I stopped by. Some very beautiful photos of a country I've always wanted to visit.

And thanks for visiting my blog.

Sara said...

Dina, thank you for showing us that colorful street scene...and that woman's painting, which I like very much by the way. I loved seeing the other painter perched on those wonderful stone walls too. Makes me wish I was there in person!

Now I'm going over to "Around the Island" to see more summer.

Dianne said...

she is creating a wonderful painting

your photos are fascinating

Ann said...

I love that ancient stonework.

Tumblewords: said...

Beautiful! I can only imagine how pleasant it would be to paint right there, and there, and there.

Ann said...

All we were told re the flood is that water entered the basement and the pumps failed to work. Someone said it could be groundwater due to heavy rain over the last week or so. Apparently it happened a few years ago as well and they lost heaps of records.

Blognote said...

I like the shots of Jerusalem's daily life! Bravo, Dina!!

RuneE said...

I admire those who can use the paintbrush and the paint - I can't even draw a line without a ruler.

Stanley said...

Nice! I love watching people paint. Really inspiring to see how they magically fill the canvas.

Jew Wishes said...

These photos are absolutely fantastic! You've captured soul and essence in them.

Bonnie Bonsai said...

That is so beautiful Dina and what a lovely title to the Post.

Your world is one to be watched because it is the most important setting of all the places in the world.

Good morning from Down Under.

Pietro said...

Great sequence, Dina. Interesting the painters at work and really amazing the stone walls.
Have a nice week ahead!

Dina ... UK said...

Hi Dina,
I would love to look round the old city one day....
I would be in my glory.....

amanda said...

What a great story your photos tell, thanks for sharing them with us!

Leora said...

Delightful finds, Dina. My aunt used to live in Jerusalem for many years, where she painted. Now she lives in assisted living in Haifa area - I hope she is still painting! Love these painterly discoveries.