Monday, September 19, 2011

"I am the door"

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Here's a very tall door for Monday Doorways and some words of explanation for Our World Tuesday.
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Enlarge* the photo to enjoy the Latin words in gold.
Latin scholars out there, can you translate? I think the words are based on passages from the Gospel of John.
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I'm just guessing here, but maybe it is

EGO SUM OSTIUM + DICIT + DNS +
I am the door, says the Lord,

SI - OVIS SITIT VENIAT + AD ME ET BIBAT +
if the sheep thirst, let them come to me and drink.




Here is the door from afar, to the right of the smaller door.

The church is from Crusader times, 12th century.
We have talked about this church and Benedictine monastery in Abu Ghosh quite often lately.

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*UPDATE:
Dear readers, I am sorry the photos no longer enlarge when opened.
Blogger has changed the photo viewing system just recently and everyone hates it.
See the discussion here:
http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/blogger/thread?tid=73493b0be3a4116d&hl=en
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UPDATE 2: Thanks to blogger Martus for solving the mystery of what is written on the door. Please see his comment near the end of the Comments section.
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19 comments:

Louis la Vache said...

Fantastic, Dina!
«Louis» doesnt' know traditional Latin, much less "Pig Latin", but his guess is that you are very close (if not spot-on) in your translation.

A very fascinating entry for Monday Doorways.
;-D

Reader Wil said...

The door is beautiful and so is the church, you mentioned. I wonder what kind of history lies behind that door. The crusaders have a kind of a bad reputation, I think.

VP said...

I can't enlarge the photo, so my scarce Latin will be of no use here...

RuneE said...

I was fascinated by the difference between the large and the small doors. Quite a contrast.

ρομπερτ said...

How very wonderful a journey !


Please have a good Tuesday you all.

Leif Hagen said...

It's a magnificent doorway with lots of handsome craftsmanship!

Arija said...

A pity I too could not enlarge the door and when I drew it out on my apple screen it became too fuzzy to read although the golden letters gleamed.
The antiquity and sturdiness of the church just sings to one's soul.

Kay L. Davies said...

It's a beautiful door, but I agree with my friend Wil — I don't think much of the Crusaders. They were not nice people and they certainly gave Christianity a bad name.
The photo wouldn't enlarge for me, either, but I think Louis is right about your translation. Well done.
— K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

Virginia said...

Lovely door but I"m not one to translate for you, sorry.
Your country is so rich....
V

crystal said...

It is a beautiful door. The monastery looks so peaceful.

Pietro said...

What a splendid door, but I can't enlarge the photo.

J Bar said...

Beautiful door.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Dina said...

Dear readers, I am sorry the photos no longer enlarge when opened. Blogger has changed the photo viewing system just recently and everyone hates it.
See the discussion here:
http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/blogger/thread?tid=73493b0be3a4116d&hl=en

Suzanne said...

Dina,
I love the second photo, nice composition and the door is very interesting. Next time I want to spend more time in Abu Ghosh. Will you be my guide??

Mo said...

I'll go with your translation. A beautiful door whatever it says

Spiderdama said...

A very beautiful door and also that small one. Your translation is certainly very close.. I do not understand.
But, I like to think it should be like Jesus said: "Whoever is thirsty should come to me and drink!"

Happy week to you!:-)

Rob and Mandy said...

Correct translation. It is such a lovely and powerful text

Francisca said...

Beautiful door, but don't ask me about Latin. I'm curious why your first door image doesn't enlarge in the new lightbox feature, because your second one does. I agree with the majority in the debate that this should be a feature that a blogger can enable or disable.

[About the movie: hard to express in a few words. I abhor violence of any kind. Still I am perplexed why the monks felt they had to stay - in a country not their own - and be martyred. What did they achieve thereby?]

μαρτυς said...

A bit late, but here's a translation:

EGO SUM OSTIUM

This is definitely from the Vulgate version of John 10:9 and says, “I am the door”.

DICIT DNS

“Dicit” means “says” and “DNS” is an abbreviation for “DOMINUS”, which means “Lord”.

SI OVIS SITIT VENIAT AD ME ET BIBAT

The “O” in “OVIS” is actually a “Q” and the “V” is a Latinized “U”, making “QUIS”, which, after "Si" means "if one" as in "anyone". It’s from the last clause of John 7:37, which reads, “…if any man thirst, let him come to me, and drink” (KJV).

So, altogether:

I AM THE DOOR,” SAYS THE LORD, “IF ONE THIRSTS, COME TO ME AND DRINK.”