Wednesday, May 23, 2012

The bee's knees

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On the long (almost two hour) train ride from Jerusalem to Tel Aviv, I used the time to take pictures.
Even some stealth shots under the table.

I was glad the young man sitting facing me had his rifle pointing NOT in my direction.
It didn't seem to bother the couple across the aisle.

But when I got home that night and examined the photos, I was puzzled by those two things on the front of the gun.
I kept saying, you're not in Arkansas anymore, Dina, stop thinking "double-barreled shotgun."

My son, who knows almost everything, had the answer.
It is a bipod that you can fold down to support the weapon when firing.

Look here for photos of American Harris BiPods for sale.
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I know, readers are going to ask. So here are some possible answers I gleaned from the Wikipedia article titled "Gun politics" :

Soldiers are allowed to carry their personal weapons and ammunition while on furlough during active service, uniformed or in civilian clothing. ...
Residents of Israeli settlements in the West Bank are issued assault rifles and ammunition by the army, and are given civil defense training. However, the rifles and munitions are property of the army, and may be confiscated at any time. ...
Self-defense firearms may be carried in public, concealed or openly. Israel is notable for being a country with few places where firearms are off limits to licensed individuals (private premises, some government offices and institutions, courts). ...
Gun ownership in Israel is considered a privilege and not a right.

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15 comments:

VP said...

OK, that's the first thing you notice when you got there. I also saw that people around groups of children tend to be seriously armed.
It was even more strange seeing quite elegant middle-aged ladies carrying machine guns with their purses.

Dina said...

VP, I haven't seen middle-aged ladies that you mention. But I am always impressed by the 18 year old soldier girls on the bus with the big rifle slung over their shoulder. It is as if it is almost as long as they are tall.

Rob and Mandy said...

I have never been, and probably never will be comfortable with this. I can understand the reason for carrying weapons in Israel, did it myself, but... Glad it's a 'privilege' and not a right.

Patsy said...

Like some say in ARKANSAS it is about our God and gun's.(scary times)

cieldequimper said...

That would be a VERY strange situation to me...

(And Dina, you peek at men from underneath tables??? Really??? Okay, okay, I'm outta here... :-))

Birdman said...

Sheesh! All I was worried about on the ferry the other day was dogs!

crystal said...

So different here! I once borrowed a shotgun from my college boyfriend when there was a rapist loose around here but I was always too afraid to even load it :)

Sara said...

I remember seeing this on my visits...so your photo did not surprise me. But I would also be as glad as you were that it was not pointing in my direction!

What a different reaction this would elicit here in the US. There was a time in my life when I learned how to shoot a pistol and a rifle and a shotgun...it was fun, though much too loud. Distant memories now....

Kris said...

Firearms give me the willies. I've never actually touched one. Hopefully I'll never need to!

Spiderdama said...

This is special... Anyway, I always feel safe in Israel. More than other places.. In Norway, not even the police bears weapon, only in special cases.
Hope you have a good week:-)

This is Belgium said...

I think the comment of Spiderdrama puts it all in perspective !
anni

Dina said...

Thanks everyone. I really enjoy your comments on this.

Ciel, LOL. No, I just had the camera on my lap, hidden by the table.

Suzanne said...

Thanks for yesterday's entry and today's. I always learn something from you.

Haddock said...

I think "preparedness" and self defense are the two best things that this country is following.

Hilda said...

Not something I'd want pointed at me, either. Or even SEE on a vehicle with me.