Monday, April 12, 2010

Across the valley

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From sunset to sunset it has been a long and heavy day. The Holocaust memorial day always is.

All these buildings spread out on Mt. Herzl are Yad VaShem, Israel's Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority.
From the looks of the crane, they are adding even more to it.
An impressive aerial photo is at their website.
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I wish there had never been a reason to build such a memorial place.

But my world today, for That's My World Tuesday, was not only the sadness of Yad VaShem and Auschwitz and Yom HaShoah.

I stood at the highest point of Jerusalem's Har Nof neighborhood to take the first photo. If you turn the camera a quarter turn to the right, this second picture is what you see.
Hadassah Medical Organization, a place of healing, teaching, and learning!
And on the hilltop beyond the hospital--my moshav, a place of new life for the new immigrants who founded the village in 1950!
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19 comments:

Virginia said...

We all wish that memorial had never had to be built. A sad day for our world DIna.
V

L. D. Burgus said...

It is beyond human the acts that they did. I watched a pbs special yesterday about the taking of paintings and sculpture from the Jewish homes in many countries. I can't even fathom the evil that existed and will never understand it.

VP said...

I visited Yad VaShem on my first trip in Israel and I found it so simple and impressive. I found just planted tree of one of our Righteous, Giorgio Perlasca, who saved thousands of Hungarian Jews impersonating the Spanish consul.

Jedediah said...

I, too, wish that there had never been a need to build such a memorial.

cieldequimper said...

I still wonder how it could have happened.
I walked past the "mémorial de la déportation" on Saturday. At least we avoid forgetting.

Cloudia said...

Sigh






Aloha from Waikiki


Comfort Spiral

Jew Wishes said...

I wish there wasn't purpose for it, also, Dina.

Sadness, sadness, sadness...

Jossie said...

Yes, it is a sad remembrance. A very black spot in history.

Al said...

It's an awful thing that is so important to remember. My son's school recently had a Holocaust survivor talk to them, it's important to pass those memories on while we still can.

Dimple said...

It is a horror that must never be forgotten.

Leif Hagen said...

I had good intentions to attend a remembrance service yesterday evening in St. Paul which was suggested by a Jewish client of mine but I was too tired after a day working in our yard and garden to go. It's an important day for us to remember and not forget!
Shalom dear Dina

Pietro said...

Like cieldequimper, I still wonder how it could have happened.

Jenn said...

A sad remembrance indeed. How apt too to establish a healing center close by.

mybackyardbirds said...

The views are stunning without an explanation but with that, they are most meaningful to me.

Louis la Vache said...

The second image is a fine contrast to the first. Sad as it is that there is a need for the Holocaust Memorial, equally disturbing is that there are still people in the world very near Israel who want to bring about another Holocaust - and even more disturbing are those (whom «Louis» won't name here) who aid and abet those enemies of Israel, many of them located in the U.S. You know of whom «Louis» writes...

JM said...

It's much beyhond understanding! And just 70 years ago!
Thanks for the link, some amazing photos there!

moneythoughts said...

There will always be a need to remember because there will always be a need for Israel to exist. In the autobiography, A Tale of Love and Darkness, Amos Oz tells of the writing on a wall in eastern Europe before Israel existed as a State, that read, "Jews go to Palestine." When he visited eastern Europe in the 1970s, the writing on the wall said, "Jews get out of Palestine." Some countries before WWII said, "no Jews is too many." When you are a Jew and you live on this planet, history has taught us that you better be prepared to fight for your survival otherwise you will die.

Arija said...

Dina, I am so glad you juxtaposed the sad, sad monument with the second photo which to me spells hope.
I understand well your national day of mourning, my little homeland has one too. When Hitler and Stalin made their secret pact in 1940, the Russians marched in and arrested anyone in state employ with hundreds of thousands disappearing to be shot or sent to Siberia. It was a large portion our total population and was followed by more waves of arrests in which I also lost my father.

Dina said...

Dear friends--thank you, each one, for what you have brought to the discussion.
And Arija, thank you for reminding us that other peoples and nations had sad stories too. I am so sorry for your own family's tragedy.