Sunday, September 12, 2010

A bridge over ancient history

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For Sunday Bridges over at San Francisco Bay Daily Photo, here is a bridge, of sorts, in Jerusalem.
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The 16th century Damascus Gate is the main entry into the Muslim Quarter.
From the street and sidewalk and plaza outside the portal you must walk over a bridge to enter the Old City.

The modern bridge rests on the remains of earlier structures, most of them from the Crusader period. The Crusaders built their own gate here after they captured Jerusalem in 1099.
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Even farther down is what the tour sign calls the Roman Square.
The Roman Legion destroyed the Temple in 70 C.E. In the 2nd century emperor Hadrian changed Jerusalem's name to Aelia Capitolina and it became a pagan Roman city.
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The arch you see in the photo is the only survivor of a magnificent Roman triumphal arch which was comprised of three vaulted gates.
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20 comments:

VP said...

I spent many happy mornings roaming around this gate with my camera.

BlossomFlowerGirl said...

It's amazing that something built so long ago still stands. Thanks too for providing some history about it. That little door below looks like it could lead to the dungeons!

Ann said...

Do the Muslims and the Christians and the Jews mix and walk on the bridge?

Francisca said...

This is a bridge I hope to walk on one day.

Kate said...

Such antiquity abounds in your country. I, too, remember this particlar gate. I spent my time in Israel in a state of awe. Great photos!

Elisa said...

I wish I could be there some day :)
Elisa, Argentina

Dina said...

Dear friends, I hope you can all visit Jerusalem once, or come again.

Ann, well, they could if they wanted to or needed to. In practice though, you see mostly Arabs around the Damascus Gate because it leads from the Arab business section of Sultan Suleiman Street in east Jerusalem into the Muslim Quarter of the Old City. Because of the routes of most tours, most tourist groups use the Jaffa Gate or Zion Gate.
I used to feel a bit strange walking alone around the Damascus Gate, just because I felt like I was the only Jewish Israeli woman there among the crowds. Not fearful, just sort of out of place.
But now that I am a blogger and have a mission, I feel I belong, everywhere in Jerusalem. :)

Lesley said...

Dina, I love that sentiment - that as a blogger you have a mission and therefore belong everywhere!!

Kaori said...

I am always in awe of how much history you have around you just around the corner! Lovely photo :D

Luna Miranda said...

looks like a pretty crowded bridge. it's amazing how old structures survive after centuries. i wish i could visit Jerusalem someday.

Kay said...

I see you're wandering about the city again now that Naomi and Libby have left. It is definitely good to keep busy.

Pat said...

I can't imagine the work involved in building this magnificent place. Thanks for a little of the history and the great photos!

Adullamite said...

The souk on the other side is a struggle to pass through! The entire population in one place! :)

JM said...

Damascus Gate! I would love to vist the site!

VioletSky said...

I like how they built the new bridge on top of the old ones.

Jew Wishes said...

The pictures are wonderful, and your description is, also. We learn so much from you. Thank you.

Leif Hagen said...

These photos are phenomenal! Such ancient history - wowie zowie!
Nice to catch up on your blog this evening

Pietro said...

So attractive!

spacedlaw said...

Wonderful walls!

Louis la Vache said...

Excellent choice for Sunday Bridges, Dina!